Porbeagle!

Posted by on Jul 25, 2013 in Sighting Updates | 2 Comments

We’re adding a new species to our sightings database: the porbeagle!
Jon Southard spotted a porbeagle between White Horse Island and Adams Island, in the Bay of Fundy on July 6, 2013.
Check out the great photograph he took of it, as it swam beside his boat. You can clearly see the distinct white patch on the trailing edge of its first dorsal fin–a key feature of the porbeagle.

Photograph of a porbeagle taken by Jon Southard. Jon sighted this porbeagle July 6, 2013 between White Horse Island and Adams Island in the Bay of Fundy

Photograph of a porbeagle taken by Jon Southard. Jon sighted this porbeagle July 6, 2013 between White Horse Island and Adams Island in the Bay of Fundy

Approximate location of the porbeagle sighted by John Southard on July 6, 2013.

Approximate location of the porbeagle sighted by John Southard on July 6, 2013.

2 Comments

  1. William deB. Mills
    August 10, 2013

    Since I am doing a lot of kayaking in the Bay of Fundy this summer (especially the eastern shores of Campobello and Deer Island), reports and photos like this catch my attention. I’ve seen lots of dolphins but no sharks. Is that because the sharks tend to swim below the surface? Is much known about the habits of Fundy sharks – where they congregate, whether or not they might find swimmers in Campobello’s irresistible coves of interest, etc.?

    Thanks for the report!

    Reply
    • sharkid
      August 16, 2013

      Great question! A large part of why we started this shark sighting database is to get a better understanding of shark distribution in the Bay of Fundy–where they’re found in large numbers and when. And this will all be species specific. One big reason why you are less likely to see sharks from your kayak is because they don’t have to come up to the surface to breathe, so spend more time below the surface. The exception being the basking shark–however, they are more commonly sighted further offshore. We have had reports of porbeagles being sighted closer to shore, so keep you eyes open and you might get lucky! And remember, sharks are much more wary of humans than interested.

      Reply

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